Guest Author: Heather Massey

Heather MasseyFor any fan of science fiction romance, if you haven’t checked out the fabulous site, The Galaxy Express, then you don’t know what you’re missing. Regardless if you’re new or old to the genre, Heather Massey is someone you really should be reading if you haven’t started already.  Heather has just released her first SF Romance, Once Upon a Time in Space.

In the distant future, Earth is dying. The planet is an overpopulated pit of despair. Humans dwell underground, but the crust is quickly disintegrating, killing millions. The rest have no escape. Nick Venture, a strapping mechanic with a secret heritage, faces an unjust death sentence. Desperate to avoid this fate, he accepts an offer from a rogue scientist to claim a newly-discovered planet in exchange for his freedom. To his surprise, Nick discovers he is the last living descendant of Christopher Columbus. Joined by a ragtag group of ex-military soldiers, he embarks on a mission to save humanity. This journey places him on a collision course with Raquel Donovan, the deadliest pirate in the galaxy. The sexy, patch-eyed captain of the Deathraven is on a mission of her own—one of vengeance. The last man she expected to encounter was the devastatingly handsome Nick Venture. But his ships are a bounty beyond her wildest dreams. After she enslaves Nick and his crew during a hijack, the two adversaries find themselves irresistibly drawn to one another. But Nick is far more than he seems. When he traps Raquel with a clever ruse, she has no choice but to join the mission as his protector. As the journey continues, their attraction ignites like a raging solar storm. Raquel is a mystery Nick is determined to unravel. But her secret agenda, as well as their lust soaked encounters, threaten to derail both of their missions even as humanity’s time runs out….

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Finding Your Significant “Other” in Science Fiction Romance

Before we embark on a search for your significant “Other” in science fiction romance, I have a joke for you:

An alien walks into a bar, sits next to a drunk guy, and begins poking him in the shoulder.
The drunk guy just ignores him.
After a while, the guy turns to the alien and begins looking him up and down.
He notices that the alien has no genitalia.
He then says, “You have no genitalia! How do you have sex?”
The alien, still poking him in the arm, just smiles!

HMassey-Once Upon A Time In SpaceThis joke captures, albeit with more than a bit of tongue-in-cheek action, how science fiction romance has created a thriving place for exploring the allure of the “Other.” Vampires and werewolves are great and all, but readers are also looking for something else to sink their teeth into.

What do I mean by “Other”? Basically, the term refers to a character that is different from us in a significant or extraordinary way. These characters can be exotic, such as alien species, or they can have elements such as superhuman qualities or unusual occupations.

In science fiction romance, the heroes and heroines are often Earth-type humans who cross paths with villains or other secondary characters that assume the role of “Other.” But readers are rewarded with a particularly exciting experience when the “Other” is the hero, the heroine, or even both of them.

Aliens are the most popular form of “Other” in science fiction romance. You can find romances featuring alien-human hybrids, shifters, and even vampire-like aliens. Authors have written love stories involving aliens with a veritable rainbow of zoomorphic traits ranging from reptiles to insects to cats. These characters definitely aren’t your garden variety science fiction aliens with gray skin and big heads. Rather, these heroes and heroines are created with the romance reader’s needs specifically in mind. Their spicy, fresh flavor adds a wonderful kick to your everyday cuisine.

But if aliens aren’t your thing, “Other” also refers to fringe/outlaw characters such as space pirates, mercenaries, rebels, or bounty hunters. Just imagine the thrill of taming such a mad, bad, and dangerous to know creature. Androids, cyborgs, and other artificial intelligence creations also fall under this category. Though grounded in technology and possessing amazing powers, compelling tales abound regarding their desires to find security, acceptance, and love.

The beauty of science fiction romance stories is that they frequently transform the “Other” into heroes and heroines that are accessible, sympathetic, and, of course, hot. Inevitably, readers are asked to consent to a definition of “hot” that takes the romance to another level, such as iridescent skin, a bit of extra fur, a synthetic body, or even wings. Six pack abs are pretty swell, but they go even better with a cyborg hero who has a supercomputer for a brain and the strength of ten men.

Heroines especially benefit from an “Other” makeover. Technology can be a great equalizer. Science fiction romance opens up the possibilities for empowering heroines with cool gadgets and kick-butt roles. They can rule galaxy-spanning corporations or create wonders in a science lab. And nothing says “sexy” better than a woman who’s the captain of her own starship.

Science fiction romances demonstrate that despite differences in culture, status, appearance, or physiological makeup, two beings from different worlds or cultures can fall in love and even have passionate sex. The differences themselves are the ultimate aphrodisiac: they fire up the senses and awaken the mind to other possibilities.

Think about the “Other” this way: if you’ve ever fallen in love, you’re attracted to the qualities of your lover that are different, new, and exciting to you. You’re seeking a romantic experience that takes you beyond the ordinary. Science fiction romance vicariously satisfies that need by providing readers with a whole new frontier of exotic heroes and heroines.

I cordially invite you to find an “Other” in science fiction romance that’s right for you. Better yet, poke one in the shoulder today. What you discover may just surprise and delight you.

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Heather Massey is a lifelong fan of science fiction romance. She searches for sci-fi romance adventures aboard her blog, The Galaxy Express.

Heather’s debut erotic sci-fi romance novel, Once Upon a Time in Space (published by Red Sage Publishing), features the last living descendant of Christopher Columbus on a desperate quest to find a new world. Standing in his way is Raquel, the deadliest space pirate in the galaxy.

For more information, visit her Web site at www.heathermassey.com.

Contact Info
Website: www.heathermassey.com
Blog: The Galaxy Express
Social Media: Facebook / Twitter

Want to purchase Heather’s novel?
Once Upon A Time In Space at Amazon or Red Sage Publishing

About Jackie 3273 Articles
I am a 30-something SAHM with two adorable boys and a supportive husband who is very tolerant of my reading addiction. I love to read and easily go through about a dozen books a month – well I did before I had kids. Now, not so much. After my first son was born, I began to take my hobby of reviewing a little more serious and started Literary Escapism to help with my sanity. I love to discuss the fabulous novels I’ve read and meeting all the wonderful people in the book blogging community has been amazing.

5 Comments

  1. LOL! Love the joke and the analogy! You make some great points. What I love about science fiction romance is the fish out of water possibilities. I’ve always loved putting characters in weird situations and watching them squirm. And I love reading out it and what is more “out of water” for us than space?

    thanks for a fun blog! Lots to think about. :-)

  2. The other is always inside me, yearning to have it’s name plastered on paper. Metrodites are mine.

    Love your extensive overview of the essential SFR topic Heather!

  3. @Pauline Couldn’t agree more about the exotic possibilities of SFR. Thanks for reading!

    @Jessica Thanks for visiting!

    @Joy Shaw You’re a true poet.

    @SuperHappyJen Not at all! Authors have come up with so many interesting alien characters that humans sometimes pale in comparison. Plus, alien heroes and heroines allows for exploring many different types of fantasies–both sexual, emotional, cultural, and psychological. Discovering new aliens is one of the best parts of the subgenre.

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